Pam Longobardi

"I was trained as a painter and printmaker, and continue this in my studio practice, but have always worked in varying mediums from photography to painting and collage to installation, allowing the ideas to dictate the materials I work with.  I am interested in the collision between nature and global consumer culture. Ocean plastic is a material that can unleash unpredictable dynamics.  I am interested in it in particular, as opposed to all garbage in general, because of what it reveals about us as a global culture and what it reveals about the ocean as a type of cultural space, as well as a giant dynamic engine of life and change." – Pam Longobardi 

 

Pam's artwork involves painting, photography, and installation to address the psychological relationship of humans to the natural world. Her artwork has been exhibited worldwide. Presently she drifts with the ongoing Drifters Project, following the world ocean currents. With the Drifters Project, she collects, documents and transforms oceanic plastic into installations and photography. The work provides a visual statement about the engine of global consumption and the vast amounts of plastic objects and their impact on the world’s most remote places and its creatures. Longobardi’s work is framed within a conversation about globalism and conservation. Longobardi was featured in a National Geographic film on the GYRE expedition and her Drifters Project was featured in National Geographic magazine. She won the prestigious Hudgens Prize (2013), one of the largest single prizes given to an artist in North America. Pam has an ongoing collaboration supported by the Ionion Center for Art and Culture in Metaxata, Kefalonia, Greece. In 2014, Longobardi was awarded the title of Distinguished University Professor, and has been named Oceanic Society’s Artist-In-Nature.

 

She currently lives and works in Atlanta and is Professor of Art at Georgia State University.